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Because our mission is to create a more tolerant society, we invest great effort and resources into public education and outreach. Our research projects are conducted with outreach in mind, which means our researchers are also working with local communities, schools and organisations to disseminate their research findings.


Our education-related training is flexible and tailored to your needs. We can now host courses at the Woolf Institute's purpose built offices in central Cambridge, or bring them to you or your workplace.

Get in touch to find out how we can work together: enquiries@cam.ac.uk

Interfaith Workshop in Schools

The Living in Harmony project at the Woolf Institute explores the cultural and social implications of musical encounters between Muslim, Jewish and Christian neighbours in historical Iraq and Syria. It examines how the role of music and musical performance created a sense of communal belonging in the past and may continue to create a sense of commonality among the various faith communities in diaspora. Guided by melodies and maqams heard in mosques, churches, and synagogues across the Middle East, the sessions offer students a unique way to engage with Middle Eastern culture, religion, and history. In doing so, we hope to provide students with creative tools for making connections and building bridges of understanding between diverse faith communities.

Contact the project's Researcher and Outreach Officer, Dunya Habash (dh599@cam.ac.uk), to discuss running a workshop at your school.

Research Project: Teaching our own and other faiths in schools: International Issues in Religious Education

The Woolf Institute's transatlantic project, Teaching our own and other faiths in schools: International Issues in Religious Education, was organised in conjunction with the University of Cambridge Faculty of Education. This project aimed to identify and share international best practice in teaching RE with a view to providing high quality professional development for schools and teachers in the UK and US. The particular sample of schools chosen to participate are secondary schools, largely with a Muslim, Jewish or Christian faith foundation - and a few state secularist schools in the UK.

Through an international Symposium and Conference this project identified principles for teaching and learning about other faiths, in both countries, which are both culturally sensitive and theologically aware. These principles were then disseminated across schools in the US and UK via a written report and toolkit.